National Parks

Yosemite--Finally!

I visited Yosemite National Park in 2015, but until very recently I have not offered prints of my photographs from Yosemite.

El Capitan Starry Night, Yosemite National Park

Until now I have not printed my Yosemite photographs. Why did it take so long for me to start printing and selling these photographs? Honestly, I have no idea! But I am pleased to announce that I am now selling prints of two of my favorite photographs from Yosemite.

The photograph above is from a well-known location in Yosemite Valley looking back at El Capitan on the left. Unfortunately during my visit the skies were clear most of the time, and the sunsets and sunrises were bland as a result. The snow adds an extra dimension of interest, however, and since I wanted something going on in the sky I decided to wait until it was dark enough to capture the stars in my photograph. I love the combination of stars and snow--something about that makes the photograph feel extra cold to me.

Half Dome on the Merced River, Yosemite National Park

Here’s the other photograph I have printed. I love this one too. It’s one of the few black and white photographs I have made. I thought that it would be appropriate to make some black and white photographs in Yosemite where Ansel Adams made many of his famous images. I don’t like to compare myself to the master, but I will say that one of my customers at the Sacramento Arts Festival who purchased a print of this photograph said that it will go well with their collection of Ansel Adams photographs. I was truly flattered by that comment.

So it took some time for me to get to print these photographs, but I love the results, and I’m excited to be selling them at art festivals and online now. I hope you enjoy them!

A Trip to the Moon

I love to photograph the Milky Way. For me it’s just one of those things I love to do. This time I was in Death Valley.

A Trip to the Moon, Death Valley National Park

Yes, this is Death Valley. It may look like I took a trip to the Moon, and that’s exactly what I wanted this photograph to look like!

It’s not difficult to photograph the Milky Way. It takes a little preparation and planning, but once that’s out of the way, if you point your camera at the sky and make an extended exposure on a solid tripod, you’re going to capture the Milky Way easily. So there are really no technical hurdles to photographing the Milky Way.

The real trick is finding a way to fit the Milky Way into your overall composition to make something interesting and perhaps unique. There are lots of obvious things to do. For example, one of the most popular places for photographers in Death Valley is Zabriskie Point. The Milky Way positions itself nicely over Zabriskie Point, so it’s a good place to photograph at night. Here’s the photograph I made there.

Milky Way over Zabriskie Point, Death Valley National Park. Note Jupiter in the upper right.

Milky Way over Zabriskie Point, Death Valley National Park. Note Jupiter in the upper right.

But that was the last photograph I made that night, and I really only stopped there on my way out of the park to check it out. There were a couple other photographers there--a crowd at 1:00 AM--so clearly this was a relatively standard place to photograph from.

While I was considering locations during the day, I stopped at Zabriskie Point, but I later found something that gave me an idea. I found a mound or large hill covered with volcanic-looking rocks. To me it looked like the surface of the Moon, and that inspired my idea. Why not make a photograph from this location and make it look like it was taken from the Moon?

There was no vegetation or other signs of life, so it was perfect. The rocks look grey just like on the Moon. The only things that give it away are the slight haze from the atmosphere and some light pollution. Otherwise, I think this is a pretty good representation of the surface of the Moon.

I moved around and made a couple other compositions there. Aside from being a not too hot 80 degrees at night, a strong wind, my car sitting about 250 yards away, and a vehicle driving down the road every now and then, I felt like I could have been standing on the Moon. It was great fun!

Lunar Surface at Death Valley, Death Valley National Park

A Death Valley Oasis

When you think of Death Valley, you probably think of an arid desert and extremely high temperatures. Maybe you think of rattlesnakes, lizards, and scrub brush. All those elements seem appropriate for a place named “Death Valley.”

Darwin Falls, Death Valley National Park

But one small area of the park defies these descriptions of Death Valley. It is an oasis of trees and lush vegetation, cool, flowing water and waterfalls, and colorful dragonflies. Darwin Falls is located in the Panamint Springs area of Death Valley near the western edge of the park, and as I discovered during my visit, it is a surprising and refreshing contrast to the rest of the park.

After driving a couple miles on a dirt road, I arrived at the parking area. From there it was about a mile hike to the first of the falls. When I started hiking it was about 85 or 90 degrees outside, and the terrain was the typical Death Valley mountain and desert landscape. As I proceeded, I became aware of some changes in the environment, however. I heard crickets, and there were some large bushes that I wouldn’t normally expect to find in Death Valley. Then there were puddles of water on the path.

These changes quickly opened up into a completely different environment. I heard the running water of a stream, and I was protected from the hot sun by the shade of large trees. I crossed the stream a few times. There was a large pool of water, and I could see tadpoles swimming in it. I continued and began to hear the louder sound of a larger waterfall. Along the way, many dragonflies were flying around the area. I turned the corner and arrived at the Darwin Falls. As I approached, I imagined it might only be a mirage. The flowing water and green vegetation seemed completely out of place in Death Valley.

The water, fed by a spring that sustains the falls year round, poured down fifteen feet into a small but relatively deep pool. It was cold water, and several people came to take a dip in it while I was there. Both red and blue dragonflies inhabit the area. I noticed that the blue ones liked to land on logs and other things, and the larger red ones liked to fly around more. It was a completely surreal scene. It felt like a fantasy. Was this really Death Valley?

It was Death Valley, and it’s another one of the stunningly beautiful features of the Mojave Desert I have encountered in Death Valley National Park. Unlike those other features, however, this small area of refuge is truly an oasis in the desert.

The Best Time to Enjoy Bryce Canyon National Park

As a landscape photographer, I find myself working mostly around sunrise and sunset. In general, these are the best times to make landscape photographs because of the beautiful and colorful light they provide. At Bryce Canyon National Park, however, I mostly prefer to work around sunrise.

Shadows and Light at Sunrise, Bryce Canyon National Park

The main reason I prefer sunrise is because more of the Bryce amphitheater gets the earliest light. At sunset, except in a few areas, the entire amphitheater is in shadow well before the sun has set. Under these conditions, the light is flat and dull. We really want that rich, golden light to fall on the rock formations to help bring out their deep orange and red colors.

Here’s an example, which I made very shortly after sunrise. The sun only shines on the right side of the highest formations. Another benefit of this time of day, which you can see here, is that a lot of the golden morning light reflects around and helps bring out the color of the surrounding hoodoos. It creates a glowing effect. This photograph has depth because of the play of light and shadow, and these kinds of scenes are more plentiful in the morning.

Morning light begins to illuminate the hoodoos, Bryce Canyon National Park

There are certainly good opportunities at sunset as well. Here’s one example from the first night of my trip last month. Here, the last bit of light on the landscape lights up the features in the distance, opposite of where the amphitheater is located. The sky, of course, is still getting light, which provides the benefit of having the sunset colors bouncing off the clouds in this photograph.

Evening Clouds Over Bryce, Bryce Canyon National Park

It is easier for me to find great photographs to make at Bryce during sunrise, however, so I prefer that time. This photograph, which I made from Bryce Point at sunrise during a previous visit, best illustrates my point. Look how much of the amphitheater on the left side of photograph is illuminated in the early morning light. To see the corresponding photograph at sunset, take a look at this blog article, and you will see exactly what I’m talking about.

Sunrise, Sunset - Bryce Canyon National Park

I last visited Bryce Canyon National Park almost three years ago. Bryce is an other-worldly place of hoodoos and other colorful, sculpted rock formations. When I make landscape photographs, I especially like to photograph at sunrise and sunset because the light is best at those times. During this trip to Bryce Canyon, I decided to create two panoramic photographs from the same location--one at sunrise, and one at sunset. Here’s the sunset photograph, which I made first.

Bryce Point Sunset, Bryce Canyon National Park

When I arrived at the viewpoint, the sky was cloudy and mostly blocking the sun. The entire landscape was in shadow, and these conditions were not good for the photograph I wanted to make. One thing I’ve learned from landscape photography, however, is to have patience. I’ve also learned that the sky conditions can change quickly, especially at sunset. It wasn’t completely overcast, and if the clouds broke enough to let some sunlight through, it would be a really good opportunity for a beautiful photograph. After an anxious wait, while the sun was still just above the horizon, the clouds started to break and the sun came through. The clouds above were lit up creating a beautiful sky, and the landscape on the southeast side of the canyon was glowing a deep orange color. My patience paid off, and I was very happy with the photograph I was able to make.

The next morning I returned, but unfortunately the clouds were completely blocking the sun. I couldn’t get what I wanted that morning, but I returned the following morning. It was perfectly clear that second morning, and now the sun was casting its early morning golden orange glow on the Bryce Canyon amphitheater to the northwest.

Bryce Point Sunrise, Bryce Canyon National Park

It’s really interesting to me to compare the two photographs. I like them both for different reasons. I like the way the sun lights up the landscape at sunrise. At sunset we get some of that light, but we also have a much more dramatic and interesting sky. The feel of the photographs is completely different, which I find fascinating. If you think about it, what’s the difference between sunrise and sunset? At both times, the sun is low in the sky, and the landscape fills with yellow, red, and orange colors. But when I look at these two photographs, they feel completely different. The sunset photograph feels like sunset. That couldn’t be sunrise. I don’t know why. And the sunrise photograph feels like sunrise. It feels like the start of the new day. Maybe it’s just me because I was there, but when I look at these photographs, those are some of the feelings I get from them. Whether you get those feelings from them or not, I hope you enjoy viewing these photographs.

The North Rim

Last month I visited the North Rim of the Grand Canyon. The play of light and shadow in the canyon at sunset can be a beautiful sight, and as the last rays of sunlight illuminated parts of the canyon, I made the photograph below.

Last rays of sunlight on the North Rim, Grand Canyon National Park

I was seconds away from losing the light completely, but I caught what I wanted. When photographing sunsets I usually stay out at least 30 minutes after the sun has set because the sky can light up with color when the sun is below the horizon. At the North Rim of the Grand Canyon, however, I headed back after finishing this photograph. My primary interest was on the play of sunlight and shadows on the canyon walls. Once the sun was below the horizon, the entire canyon was in shadow and not as interesting to me.

So I got an early start back to the lodge. But on the way back, the sky began to light up. The clouds illuminated with the beautiful colors of sunset, and I decided I wanted to capture the moment. I was in a position where I could include the lodge in my photograph. I was impressed by the architecture of the lodge on the North Rim. Originally built in 1928, the lodge looked like just another part of the canyon or an extension of it. A goal of many architects of the national park lodges was to make the lodges conform to the landscape, and they succeeded in this case.

So, just as I normally do at sunset, I stayed out until it was dark and made my photograph, which I'm happy to share with you here.

Grand Canyon Lodge on the North Rim

While I was making this photograph, I had an idea that it might be nice to make a composition similar to this one later in the night when the stars were out and the Milky Way would stretch above the canyon. After my late dinner, I returned to this location, but the clouds were obscuring large portions of the sky. So I decided to experiment instead. I made a very long exposure to capture the clouds streaking across the sky. I also thought it was interesting to capture the light coming from the lodge as the primary source of light in the scene. That light and its reflections lit much of the landscape you can see. The rest was lit by the post-twilight ambient light. This is not a high-quality photograph--it has a lot of noise--but I like it because it was a fun experiment to see what kind of photograph I could make in this location with these weather and light conditions.

Grand Canyon Lodge on the North Rim on a cloudy night

The next morning I was back to my regular routine, and I made this photograph shortly after sunrise. Once again, the contrast between the shadows and light in the canyon is one of my primary subjects here.

Sunrise at the North Rim, Grand Canyon National Park

I had a nice stay at the North Rim, and I’m looking forward to my next adventure and experiment in photography.

2015 In Review

It has been a great 2015, and I thought I'd share with you some of the photographic highlights of my year.

I visited Joshua Tree National Park for the first time this year. I made two trips to the park. I focused on the trees but also on the Milky Way when I was at the park in the summer.

Joshua and Joshua, Jr., Joshua Tree National Park

Amazing Milky Way, Joshua Tree National Park

I made several trips to Death Valley this year. I was excited to get to visit the Racetrack for the first time. I also made several photographs of the Mesquite Sand Dunes. And I made the photograph of Darwin Falls that I wrote about in my last blog article. Here are some of my photographs from Death Valley this year.

Tranquility on Mesquite Dunes, Death Valley National Park

Morning Marathon on the Racetrack, Death Valley National Park

Morning Marathon on the Racetrack, Death Valley National Park

Desert Heat, Death Valley National Park

I also made a few trips to Zion. I returned from the Narrows hike with a couple of beautiful photographs. I also visited the park in the Fall and captured some of the colorful foliage.

Big Spring in the Narrows, Zion National Park

Burst of Color on the Virgin River, Zion National Park

During the summer I focused my attention on Great Basin National Park, hoping to make some Milky Way photographs. I created this photograph featuring Mount Wheeler and the Milky Way.

Milky Way Over Mount Wheeler, Great Basin National Park

I also took a trip to the Los Angeles area. Here’s a photograph I made at Laguna Beach.

Laguna Beach Aurora, Laguna Beach, CA

Those are just some of the highlights of my year photographically. I also made several new photographs around Las Vegas and during some smaller trips as well. I’m looking forward to visiting new places and returning to familiar places and seeing what I can produce in 2016. Happy new year!

A Death Valley Oasis

When you think of Death Valley, you probably think of an arid desert and extremely high temperatures. Maybe you think of rattlesnakes, lizards, and scrub brush. All those elements seem appropriate for a place named “Death Valley.”

Darwin Falls, Death Valley National Park

But one small area of the park defies these descriptions of Death Valley. It is an oasis of trees and lush vegetation, cool, flowing water and waterfalls, and colorful dragonflies. Darwin Falls is located in the Panamint Springs area of Death Valley near the western edge of the park, and as I discovered during my visit earlier this year, it is a surprising and refreshing contrast to the rest of the park.

After driving a couple miles on a dirt road, I arrived at the parking area. From there it was about a mile hike to the first of the falls. When I started hiking it was about 85 or 90 degrees outside, and the terrain was the typical Death Valley mountain and desert landscape. As I proceeded, I became aware of some changes in the environment, however. I heard crickets, and there were some large bushes that I wouldn’t normally expect to find in Death Valley. Then there were puddles of water on the path.

These changes quickly opened up into a completely different environment. I heard the running water of a stream, and I was protected from the hot sun by the shade of large trees. I crossed the stream a few times. There was a large pool of water, and I could see tadpoles swimming in it. I continued and began to hear the louder sound of a larger waterfall. Along the way, many dragonflies were flying around the area. I turned the corner and arrived at the Darwin Falls. As I approached, I imagined it might only be a mirage. The flowing water and green vegetation seemed completely out of place in Death Valley.

The water, fed by a spring that sustains the falls year round, poured down fifteen feet into a small but relatively deep pool. It was cold water, and several people came to take a dip in it while I was there. Both red and blue dragonflies inhabit the area. I noticed that the blue ones liked to land on logs and other things, and the larger red ones liked to fly around more. It was a completely surreal scene. It felt like a fantasy. Was this really Death Valley?

It was Death Valley, and it’s another one of the stunningly beautiful features of the Mojave Desert I have encountered in Death Valley National Park. Unlike those other features, however, this small area of refuge is truly an oasis in the desert.

Ubehebe Crater: A Challenging Photograph

The photograph you see here is the result of my effort to make a compelling photograph of Ubehebe Crater in Death Valley National Park. In addition to having a really cool name, the subject is very interesting, which inspired me to want to photograph it. But the actual process of making the image was not easy.

Ubehebe Crater in Death Valley National Park
Ubehebe Crater in Death Valley National Park

Ubehebe Crater is located in Death Valley National Park and formed several hundred years ago when hot magma rose to the surface and encountered a layer of water. The water quickly vaporized, and tremendous pressure built up. The result of all that steam pressure was an explosion that left behind the crater you see here. We don’t know exactly when the explosion occurred, but it’s estimated to have been around 300 years ago.

The crater is quite large; it’s around a half mile wide. I came to the crater in the afternoon and viewed it from the parking lot, which is on the north side of the crater. It’s really an amazing sight to see, and it almost feels like you’re in an alien environment. That’s actually a feeling I got in several other places in Death Valley as well. It’s an incredible place.

I walked along the rim of the crater for a while, and as I was exploring I quickly realized that photographing a crater of this size is not an easy thing to do. The problem is the light. Photography is all about light, and you need good light to create the best images. The problem is that by the time the golden hour arrives and the light is best, the interior of the crater is completely in shadow. The eastern side of the crater exposes the yellow and orange layers of rock that you can see in the photograph. I would love to capture the late afternoon and sunset light falling across those colorful rock layers, but unfortunately that is just not possible.

I traveled around to the west side of the crater and set up to capture some images. The sun was behind me and illuminating the crater and the mountains behind it in the distance. At this point in the afternoon, the east side of the crater with the orange and yellow rocks was lit up by the sunlight, and the remainder of the crater was in shadow. I created an image at this time and worked on it for quite a while at home during my post processing. In the end I discarded that version because I didn’t like the way there was such a harsh shadow line cutting across the middle of the image.

Instead, I waited until the crater was completely in shadow. The mountains in the distance were still completely illuminated. It was now 45 minutes later and about 30 minutes before the official sunset time. The light was much better, and I really like the way the distant mountains look in this final image. The shadow line is much more subtle because it kind of follows the edge of the crater so that you don’t really notice it. And there was still enough light that I was able to bring out the color in the rocks of the interior of the crater.

This photograph was a challenge to produce, both on site and in post-processing. But the result is worth it to me. I think this image captures the beauty of the crater and conveys the feeling of amazement I experienced when I saw it. I hope you enjoy it too!

Creating Art: The Grand Canyon Desert View Watchtower

On my last trip to Grand Canyon National Park, I visited Desert View in the eastern part of the park on the south rim. At Desert View you will find the Watchtower, which is a stone tower that appears to be much older than it is. It looks like it could be from Medieval times, or at least from a couple of centuries ago, but in reality it was built in 1932.

The Watchtower at Desert View,  Grand Canyon
The Watchtower at Desert View, Grand Canyon

I visited Desert View with the intention of shooting the sunset. Unfortunately, it was perfectly clear, so I wasn’t going to be able to make the kind of sunset photograph I like most. I tried to make the best of it, though. I made the image below that evening. Once I had this image, I did not wait for the sun to drop below the horizon. I was ready to move on.

Sunset from Desert View at the Grand Canyon
Sunset from Desert View at the Grand Canyon

I turned my attention to the Watchtower. The tower is an interesting structure, and I think it offers many opportunities for photography. I am planning a sunset shot that includes both the canyon and the tower, but that will require a more dramatic sky. This night I had only clear skies, so I decided to do something a little different.

I shot the tower with the idea that I might be able to give it a more dramatic look later on in my post-processing. I did a few things to this image to give it this look. First, I selected a picture of gray, stormy clouds from my catalog that I had taken in the past. I blended that image into the tower photo. I then removed almost all the color from the photograph. Next, I used a split toning technique, which involves adding a warm color like yellow or orange to the highlights (the brightest parts of the image), and a cool color like green, blue, or purple to the shadows (the darker parts of the image). That’s a common photographic technique that can create an interesting look in an image. Finally, I made some exposure and contrast adjustments to finish off the photograph.

I like the result. It’s funny because this is not what it was like that night at all. To me this image is dark, gloomy, a little mysterious, and maybe even foreboding. In reality, it was a beautiful, warm, clear evening. My effort was an artistic endeavor in which I reshaped reality to conform to something I imagined, to create something completely different.

It’s amazing what you can do with a little post-processing! In fact, I could have shot the canyon/tower image I mentioned above and then later substituted an appropriate sky from my catalog to create the final image I have in mind. I don’t like doing that, however. In landscape photography I almost never do it. It’s one of the challenges and rewards of landscape photography. You have to be patient, and sometimes it takes multiple trips to get the image you want, but the end result is worth it.

I am not opposed to making dramatic changes to a photograph for artistic purposes, however, and that’s what I did here. It’s a lot of fun to do! When I make the canyon/tower sunset image, though, it will be much closer to reality than this image is.

A Blind Sunrise at Grand Canyon National Park

Sunrise from the south rim of the Grand Canyon
Sunrise from the south rim of the Grand Canyon

On a recent trip to Grand Canyon National Park I shot what I’m calling a blind sunrise, and it was an interesting experience. I wasn’t actually “blind,” but what I mean is that I had not visited the location during the day and had no idea what the landscape was going to be like from that location and therefore no plan for what compositions I would be shooting. Also, since it was a sunrise, I arrived while it was still completely dark, so I had to wait until the start of the sunrise before I could even begin planning. Here’s the full story.

The Grand Canyon is huge. I don’t know what else to say. I arrived in the afternoon and took the shuttle bus out to the first viewpoint on Hermit Road. I walked most of the rim trail toward Hermits Rest, which is the last, western-most viewpoint on the shuttle bus line. There are several viewpoints along that part of the rim trail, and I spent time at each one. It was essentially a scouting expedition. I was looking for the location where I wanted to be for the sunset that night.

Normally I like to scout both sunrise and sunset locations, and frequently I decide to photograph both the sunrise and sunset from the same location. The Grand Canyon is so large, however, that it’s difficult to evaluate all the potential locations in one afternoon. At a place like Bryce Canyon, it’s much easier to do that. When I was at Bryce Canyon, I knew that afternoon the three locations where I wanted to position myself for sunrise and/or sunset. I’m not saying those are the only good locations or that I visited every possible viewpoint in the park, but I had a pretty good idea of what I was interested in shooting over the next couple of days based on the kind of images I had in mind. At Grand Canyon, I couldn’t possibly make that kind of plan in one afternoon.

I could have returned to the same location at sunrise that I had visited at sunset, but I wanted to experience some of the other viewpoints during my trip. Looking at the map, I found three locations on one of the other shuttle bus routes that I had not yet visited which looked like they might provide a good angle for sunrise. I selected one and decided I would go in blind.

The next morning, I took the first shuttle bus to the viewpoint. I stepped out of the bus and walked into the night. It was completely dark. I found the rim trail and headed down to the actual viewpoint. There was no light at all, except for the stars. I knew the Grand Canyon was right in front of me, but it was complete blackness except for the stars. They were extremely bright, and when I looked up I could immediately see the Milky Way. It was plain as day. I sat and waited for some light.

Sunrise from the south rim of the Grand Canyon
Sunrise from the south rim of the Grand Canyon

As the twilight began to develop, I started to see some vague shapes forming in the canyon. As the light increased, more of the landscape of the canyon was revealed. I was now able to plan what compositions I wanted to make once the sun started to rise. As the increasing light slowly illuminated the canyon, it was like a surprise being uncovered before my eyes, and the anticipation made it a fun experience.

In the end, the sunrise was not that great because it was completely clear that morning. But it was still worth it, and I made both of the photographs above. After I finished I went to one of the other potential sunrise locations I had considered. Based on the kind of composition I ended up making, I might have preferred that location. That’s why I like to scout the area first. If I have a certain kind of image in mind, then I can find the best location from which to make that image. I did enjoy this “blind” sunrise experience, however!

Sunrise, Sunset - Bryce Canyon National Park

I recently visited Bryce Canyon National Park, an other-worldly place of hoodoos and other colorful, sculpted rock formations. When shooting landscapes, I especially like to photograph at sunrise and sunset. As all photographers know, the light is best at those times of day, and good light is a key ingredient in dramatic photography that evokes an emotional response. That’s what I’m after when I photograph--I’m not trying simply to document a place. I’m trying to create a piece of art that captures the feeling of the location and the moment.

Sunset at Bryce Canyon National Park
Sunset at Bryce Canyon National Park

When I arrived on location, I knew I had a couple different dilemmas. First of all, the weather was not really cooperating. It was partly to mostly cloudy for most of the afternoon, which would have been fine, but it really started to cloud over as the afternoon wore on. I was afraid that it would be completely overcast for sunset. The second dilemma was whether it would be best to shoot at sunset or at sunrise. That was easy to solve, though--I planned to shoot at both times!

At sunset, the sky was as I feared. It was quite cloudy, and the sun wasn’t really coming through the clouds at all. The entire landscape was in shadows. One thing I’ve learned about landscape photography, however, is that patience is a virtue. I’ve also learned that the sky conditions can change quickly, especially at sunset. It wasn’t completely overcast, and there was the possibility that if the clouds broke enough to let some sunlight through, it could be a really good opportunity. I waited and took several shots as time passed. Finally, while the sun was still above the horizon, the clouds started to break and the sun came through. The clouds above were lit up creating a beautiful sky, and the landscape on the southeast side of the canyon was glowing a deep orange color. I had my opportunity and I took it. I was really happy I waited it out.

Sunrise at Bryce Canyon National Park
Sunrise at Bryce Canyon National Park

The next morning I returned, but unfortunately the clouds were completely blocking the sun. I couldn’t get what I wanted that morning, but I returned the following morning. It was perfectly clear that second morning, and now the sun was casting its early morning orange glow on the Bryce Canyon amphitheater to the northwest. I had my sunrise shot.

It’s really interesting to me to see the difference between the two images. I like them both for different reasons. I like the way the sun lights up the landscape in the sunrise shot. In the sunset shot, we get some of that, but we also have a much more dramatic and interesting sky. The feel of the photographs is completely different, which I find fascinating. If you think about it, what’s the difference between sunrise and sunset? The sun is low in the sky, the colors are yellow, red, and orange, and this is pretty much the same at both times. But when I look at these two images, they feel completely different. The sunset photograph feels like sunset. That couldn’t be sunrise. I don’t know why. And the sunrise photograph feels like sunrise. It feels like the start of the new day. Maybe it’s just me because I was there, but when I see the photographs, that’s one of the things I get from them. You might not see that, but hopefully you see something worth looking at!

If you like these images from Bryce Canyon, I have a few more posted at www.facebook.com/tesslerphotography. You can also check out my landscape gallery. Thanks for looking, and thanks for reading!